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2013_2014

Essays: Second Series
Race And Ethnicity In American History And Literature. Readings in American philosophy and cultural history, early 19th ct, "American Renaissance", Emerson, R. W. Essays: Second Series. (Experience). 1844
Essays: First Series, "Essay Spiritual Laws"
Race And Ethnicity In American History And Literature. Readings in American philosophy and cultural history, early 19th ct, "American Renaissance", Emerson, R. W. Essays: First Series. (Spiritual Laws). 1841
Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction, chapter 3: "The Meanings of Freedom", chapter 4: "An American Crisis"
Race And Ethnicity In American History And Literature. Foner, E. Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction with commentary by Joshua Brown. New York: Vintage Books, 2006. (Chapter Three: The Meanings of Freedom + Chapter Four: An American Crisis). s. 76-100 + s. 106-127.
The Souls Of Black Folk Cha 1
Race And Ethnicity In American History And Literature. Čtení z afro-amerických studií. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (New York, Bantam Classics, 1989) DuBois was one of the most important voices of the African Americans in the early 20th ct. He was also a renowned historian of the Reconstruction Era, an opponent to the prevailing propagandistic interpretation of the period (so-called "Dunning School"). His book The Souls of Black Folk is a commentary on the state of the African American community and on the social, economic, and political standing of African Americans 20 years after the end of Reconstruction.
The Souls Of The Black Folk Cha 3
Race And Ethnicity In American History And Literature. Čtení z afro-amerických studií. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (New York, Bantam Classics, 1989) DuBois was one of the most important voices of the African Americans in the early 20th ct. He was also a renowned historian of the Reconstruction Era, an opponent to the prevailing propagandistic interpretation of the period (so-called "Dunning School"). His book The Souls of Black Folk is a commentary on the state of the African American community and on the social, economic, and political standing of African Americans 20 years after the end of Reconstruction.
The Souls Of The Black Folk Cha 8
Čtení z afro-amerických studií. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (New York, Bantam Classics, 1989) DuBois was one of the most important voices of the African Americans in the early 20th ct. He was also a renowned historian of the Reconstruction Era, an opponent to the prevailing propagandistic interpretation of the period (so-called "Dunning School"). His book The Souls of Black Folk is a commentary on the state of the African American community and on the social, economic, and political standing of African Americans 20 years after the end of Reconstruction.
The Promised Land, excepts
Antin, Mary The Promised Land (New York, Penguin Books, 1997) Excerpts from an autobiography of Mary Antin, a Jewish immigrant who arrived in the U.S.A. in 1894. She describes the integration process via public elementary education provided to all qualified children of immigrants as a part of the Americanization movement, and provides an outsider's interpretation of the principles of the American society.
Facing Up to the American Dream, excerpts
Hochschild, Jennifer L. Facing Up to the American Dream: Race, Class, and the Soul of the Nation (Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1995). A critique of the major American cultural fiction – "the American Dream"
The Yellow Wallpaper
Readings in American Gender Studies
Solitude of the Self
Readings in American Gender Studies
Nobody knows my name Cha1: The Discovery of what it means to be an American
Race And Ethnicity In American History And Literature. Baldwin, James, Nobody Knows My Name – More Notes of a Native Son (New York, DELL Publishing, 1961) James Baldwin wrote Nobody Knows My Name after he returned from his stay in Europe where he went because he wanted to escape the usual pitfall into which the black writers fall: as African Americans, they cannot but reflect on the position of African Americans in the American society, the black community expects them to do so. So does the white community. Nobody expects them to speak on any other subject and these expectations bear heavily on fledgeling writers, to the point of making them doubt that they can mediate African American experience and, at the same time, American experience. To be both African American and American writers. His visit to Europe made him see that, in spite of the racial hatred at home, America was his home. It enabled him to see beyond his African American experience and to examine and criticize the very ideational basis of the American society – the ideal of the American Dream – not to destroy it – for it generates much positive, but to point out its negatives too. In his essays, Baldwin shows that, while Americans are taught to valorize spiritual and social mobility, they yearn, at the same time, for some stability in their life . They should not but they are just humans. They want to be able to rise without any limitation and yet they want to stop the possible fall to the bottom – to lose the position that have crafted by hard striving. So while it is completely contrary to the American ethos, Americans who have risen in life seek to perpetuate their position by creating artificial divisions. Baldwins suggests that the categories of white and black are replacements of status in the European sense – such as middle class vs. lower class. The membership in European classes depends on more than just money – in fact, the loss of fortune does not exclude one from his class – and thus allow its members to retain their identity and thus stability in life even if they lose their fortunes. Baldwin remarks that money and what the money can buy is the only marker of status in the American society. If one loses it, one falls virtually to the bottom the prospect of which is bound to terrify any human being. Baldwin suggests that the virulence of racism in the American society is an expression of this existential terror. s. 3-12.
Nobody knows my name Cha8: In search of a majority : an adress
Race And Ethnicity In American History And Literature. Baldwin, James, Nobody Knows My Name – More Notes of a Native Son (New York, DELL Publishing, 1961) James Baldwin wrote Nobody Knows My Name after he returned from his stay in Europe where he went because he wanted to escape the usual pitfall into which the black writers fall: as African Americans, they cannot but reflect on the position of African Americans in the American society, the black community expects them to do so. So does the white community. Nobody expects them to speak on any other subject and these expectations bear heavily on fledgeling writers, to the point of making them doubt that they can mediate African American experience and, at the same time, American experience. To be both African American and American writers. His visit to Europe made him see that, in spite of the racial hatred at home, America was his home. It enabled him to see beyond his African American experience and to examine and criticize the very ideational basis of the American society – the ideal of the American Dream – not to destroy it – for it generates much positive, but to point out its negatives too. In his essays, Baldwin shows that, while Americans are taught to valorize spiritual and social mobility, they yearn, at the same time, for some stability in their life . They should not but they are just humans. They want to be able to rise without any limitation and yet they want to stop the possible fall to the bottom – to lose the position that have crafted by hard striving. So while it is completely contrary to the American ethos, Americans who have risen in life seek to perpetuate their position by creating artificial divisions. Baldwins suggests that the categories of white and black are replacements of status in the European sense – such as middle class vs. lower class. The membership in European classes depends on more than just money – in fact, the loss of fortune does not exclude one from his class – and thus allow its members to retain their identity and thus stability in life even if they lose their fortunes. Baldwin remarks that money and what the money can buy is the only marker of status in the American society. If one loses it, one falls virtually to the bottom the prospect of which is bound to terrify any human being. Baldwin suggests that the virulence of racism in the American society is an expression of this existential terror. s. 127-137.
Nobody knows my name Cha9: Notes for a hypothetical novel
Race And Ethnicity In American History And Literature. Baldwin, James, Nobody Knows My Name – More Notes of a Native Son (New York, DELL Publishing, 1961) James Baldwin wrote Nobody Knows My Name after he returned from his stay in Europe where he went because he wanted to escape the usual pitfall into which the black writers fall: as African Americans, they cannot but reflect on the position of African Americans in the American society, the black community expects them to do so. So does the white community. Nobody expects them to speak on any other subject and these expectations bear heavily on fledgeling writers, to the point of making them doubt that they can mediate African American experience and, at the same time, American experience. To be both African American and American writers. His visit to Europe made him see that, in spite of the racial hatred at home, America was his home. It enabled him to see beyond his African American experience and to examine and criticize the very ideational basis of the American society – the ideal of the American Dream – not to destroy it – for it generates much positive, but to point out its negatives too. In his essays, Baldwin shows that, while Americans are taught to valorize spiritual and social mobility, they yearn, at the same time, for some stability in their life . They should not but they are just humans. They want to be able to rise without any limitation and yet they want to stop the possible fall to the bottom – to lose the position that have crafted by hard striving. So while it is completely contrary to the American ethos, Americans who have risen in life seek to perpetuate their position by creating artificial divisions. Baldwins suggests that the categories of white and black are replacements of status in the European sense – such as middle class vs. lower class. The membership in European classes depends on more than just money – in fact, the loss of fortune does not exclude one from his class – and thus allow its members to retain their identity and thus stability in life even if they lose their fortunes. Baldwin remarks that money and what the money can buy is the only marker of status in the American society. If one loses it, one falls virtually to the bottom the prospect of which is bound to terrify any human being. Baldwin suggests that the virulence of racism in the American society is an expression of this existential terror. s. 141-153.
Recitatif
Race And Ethnicity In American History And Literature. Readings in Afro-American literature. In: African American Literature: A Concise Anthology from Frederick Douglass to Toni Morrison. (Prestwick house, 2009). This short story deals with social constructions of identity, role of friendship, memory and racial stereotypes. Morrison attempted to delete all racial codes to question the essential features of whiteness and blackness.
The Great Gatsby (entire novel)
Race And Ethnicity In American History And Literature. Fitzgerald, Francis Scott: The Great Gatsby (New York: Scribner Paperback Fiction, 1995). The novel has often been interpreted as a dark critique of the negatives of the American society, of the social desintegration, loss of moral and other values. Less frequently the novel is read as a Bildungsroman, in which the main character – Nick Carraway, not Jay Gatsby – undergoes a spiritual journey. He comes to recognize that true "American" greatness lies in living out one's vision of life, in always hoping for something that is not and yet might be. Nick learns it from his interaction with Jay Gatsby, who is, however, an anti-hero. Gatsby has an enormous capacity for hope but, tragically, directs all his energy and imagination to recapture a moment in the past, a vague feeling of being "in control of his life" – when he was a true author of his actions, the captain of his life. He locates his future in his past, strives against the current of life, only never to return to the beginning when all seemed to make sense. He pays a too great a price for living too long with a single dream. The novel deals with the great American themes of frontier (physical and spiritual), self-construction, the nature of power.
Black Matters
Black Matters by T. Morrison.
The Phenomenology of Mind
The Phenomenology of Mind by G. F. HEGEL.
Sympathy, Harlem 1, Dream Deferred, Caged Bird
Readings in African-American literature: poems that reflect, in a chronological order, the disappointment from the failure of the American society to reform itself in order to become inclusive and fairer not just in the legislation but also in the redistribution of wealth generated in the U.S. Social reform has been an integral part of both the Reconstruction strivings and the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960's. However, no structural change to the economic system has been carried out, affirmative action was but half-heartedly supported, and the economically disadvantaged minorities have been left to fend for themselves.
Letter from a Birmingham Jail
Readings in African-American literature, period of the Civil Rights Movement (1950's-1960's). "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" was an open letter written by M.L. King Jr. addressed to all southern clergymen like himself (potential leaders of the AFA community), and broadly to all of his supporters and critics from the AFA as well as white communities. In this letter he defends his chosen strategy of non-violent direct action, talks about the nature of the AFA community, the lack of competent leadership (AFA middle class is largely co-opted into the economic system, poor African-Americans despair of an improvement and have internalized the low or at least condescending opinion of them by the white majority, and the clergymen who preach to their AFA constituency the obedience to Christian principles and laws while these principles and laws are being trampled upon daily by the southern state goverments and majority of the whites.
Biographical data on M.L. King Jr.
Information gathered mostly from Wikipedia.
Biographical data on Stokely Carmichael
Information gathered mostly from Wikipedia.
Black Power
Readings in African-American literature, period of Civil Rights Movement (1950's-1960's)
Biographical data on Malcolm X
Information gathered mostly from Wikipedia.
Excerpts from The Autobiography of Malcolm X
Excerpts from The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Malcolm X and Alex Haley (1965)
The Ballot or the Bullet
Readings in African-American literature, period of Civil Rights Movement (1950's-1960's)
Excerpts from Up From Slavery
Readings in African-American literature, period of Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction (1870's-1890's), excerpts from the autobiography by Washington, Booker T.: Up From Slavery (New York: Cosimo Classics, 2007)
Reconstruction: An Anthology of Revisionist Writings
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Borderlands La Frontera
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Invisible Man
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